Optometry

Our optometrists work to get to know you, your medical history and your immediate needs.

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Good eyesight helps you understand your world, so taking care of your eyes should be a top priority. Treatments like corrective lenses, medication and surgery can help preserve your ability to see.

An optometrist is a healthcare specialist who cares for the eyes. Optometry services at Long Island Select Healthcare (LISH) are available for Long Island residents who are concerned about their eye health.

Good eyesight helps you understand your world, so taking care of your eyes should be a top priority. Treatments like corrective lenses, medication and surgery can help preserve your ability to see.

An optometrist is a healthcare specialist who cares for the eyes. Optometry services at Long Island Select Healthcare (LISH) are available for Long Island residents who are concerned about their eye health.

Healthcare for Eyes and Vision

Your eyes require special care. Optometrists are healthcare professionals who can diagnose eye conditions and provide corrective treatments.

The job requires a Doctor of Optometry degree. In other words, optometrists are not medical doctors, but they have doctoral-level training that prepares them for this career. Therefore, you can trust these eye doctors to provide thorough care.

Ophthalmologists are another type of eye professional. They are medical doctors who specialize in eye care. These doctors often handle surgeries and other advanced eye needs. Optometrists sometimes refer complex cases to ophthalmologists.

Getting an Eye Exam

A visit to an optometry office will include an assortment of tests and assessments to evaluate your eye health and the quality of your vision.

Your eye doctor may check:

  • Your eye measurements
  • What level of vision correction you require, if any
  • How far to each side you can see
  • How well your eye muscles work
  • Whether you have glaucoma, a condition in which the fluid pressure in your eye is too high
  • Whether your eyes have sustained any damage or deterioration

The doctor will also talk to you about your eye health and your overall wellbeing. You should come prepared to discuss your medical history, your current medications and your eye concerns.

Some vision conditions can be diagnosed at the first appointment. However, if the doctor suspects a serious problem, further tests may be required.

First Eye Exam for Your Child

Your child’s primary care provider (PCP) will look at your child’s eyes during routine well visits. Even still, it’s a good idea to have an optometrist perform an eye exam.

You can bring your baby in for an eye check before her first birthday. Even though an infant can’t answer the optometrist’s questions or identify the letters on an eye chart, the doctor can still perform tests to make sure that the eyes are functioning normally.

Most children can wait a few more years for the second exam. It’s a good idea to bring your child back to the eye doctor before signing him up for kindergarten. This can help the doctor identify vision problems before they start to hinder classroom learning.

It’s especially important to start routine eye exams at a young age if there is a family history of eye problems. If your child’s primary doctor spots a problem, you may receive a referral to an optometrist. Also, you know your child best, so don’t hesitate to set up an appointment if you notice signs of a vision issue.

Frequency of Eye Services

Throughout childhood, kids should go to the eye doctor every year or at least every other year.

Adults with normal vision can spread their visits out more. In early adulthood, you may need exams only every five years or so. By the time you’re 40, the interval between appointments may need to decrease to about three years. Once you turn 55, it’s advised to visit the eye doctor every one to two years.

If you wear glasses or have other vision issues, you may need more frequent appointments than others your age. For example, people who wear contact lenses often require annual exams.

Treatments for Vision Correction and Eye Health

Many eye problems can be resolved with corrective lenses. Glasses are useful for people with nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism. Contact lenses are a popular alternative to glasses. Some people pursue corrective surgery instead of wearing glasses or contacts.

Other eye conditions may require more involved treatment. For example, if you are diagnosed with glaucoma, medical intervention will be essential. Otherwise, you could eventually lose your sight. Cataracts, strabismus and lazy eye are other conditions that may require special treatment, or you may need medical intervention after an eye injury.

Your optometry treatment plan may include:

  • Antibiotics
  • Antihistamines
  • Corticosteroids
  • Eye drops
  • Eye patch
  • Laser treatment
  • Ointment
  • Surgery
  • Vision therapy

For complicated concerns, you may need to be referred to a different specialist, such as an ophthalmologist. Optometrists can perform some procedures but most eye surgeries are left to ophthalmologists.

You may need frequent followup appointments to monitor your eye condition and make sure that your vision problems aren’t getting worse.

Eye Care Services for Long Island Patients

Routine eye exams are useful for detecting vision impairment and other eye-related problems. Through regular visits to the optometrist, early diagnosis and intervention for eye problems may be possible. Taking care of your eyes can help you preserve your vision for years to come.

Call (631) 650-2510 to schedule your eye exam at LISH. You can also learn more by sending an email through the online contact form.

 

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